Here are some flying articles that you may have missed this week:

Fairchild C-123

A TBM returns to Missoula
This is from the Missoulian in Missoula, MT. The Museum of Mountain Flying in Missoula had recently acquired a Grumman TBM Avenger that was being used as a ‘slurry bomber’ fighting fires in Canada.

What to do with your homebuilt airplane
This is from Yuma, AZ. A couple there decided it was time to take a little cross-country flight in their amateur-built airplane – 12,000 miles later and they were back home in Yuma. Mission accomplished.

47 Years in Aviation
This is a series of articles – chapters of a book – published on the AvWeb site. Richard Taylor has been in aviation for over 47 years. He has written 20 books and is the founder of The Pilot’s Audio Update. This link is to the introduction to his memoirs. So far about 6 chapters have been put online. To access chapter one (link at the bottom of the Introduction) you will have to have an account with AvWeb – the registration is free. The Chapters are well written and illustrated. A good story – put a note on your calendar to read a chapter a week.

Something to do in Hagerstown this weekend
This is from the Herald-Mail. This weekend there will be a Wings and Wheels Expo at the Hagerstown Airport on Showalter Rd. Sounds like it will be a pretty big event. The local EAA Chapter is hosting a Young Eagles event as part of the weekend. Fairchild Aircraft Company made Hagerstown it’s home and several examples of their aircraft will be on display, including the C-123, C-119 and C-82.

Barnstorming isn’t dead yet
This is from the Bradenton (FL) Times. Barnstorming will be part of the Hundsader farms Pumpkin Festival again this year. If you want to get a chance at a flight in a New Standard D-25 biplane, check out the event in Bradenton, Florida any of the last three weekends in October.

Never let go of your dream
This is from yesterday’s issue of the AOPA’ ePilot newsletter – just in case you don’t receive it. Twenty-two years ago Tim Garrett was diagnosed with MS and lost his private pilot’s license. He fought the disease into submission and proved to the FAA that he could be a safe pilot – and received a Special Issuance medical. Then he built his own plane. Now he talks to aviation groups and MS patients about how he did it.